Derry Girls Cherym Breathe New Life Into The DIY Pop-Punk Genre

Discover Irish DIY pop-punks Cherym before they explode.

Article by Alan Corcoran. Cover photo by Mickey Rooney.

Every so often a geriatric pop-punker like myself will see a band that serves as a reminder as to why you like this ridiculous genre in the first place. Derry’s Cherym are one of these bands.

Hitting the stage as a cluster of energy and a little bit of endearing nervousness, it took about 30 seconds before they won the crowd over and had everyone in the venue mentally filing the moment away for future, “I saw them before they were a thing,” conversations.

For such a young band to have songwriting chops this good is frankly sickening. Every song skirts the line between power pop and 77 punk. Every melody and musical movement is delivered with a half smile and a shrug of the shoulders, as if it’s all happening by accident. They are either naturally musically gifted or incredible at acting and this curmudgeon isn’t sure which is worse.

Lead single Take It Back sets out their stall: you’re gonna get driving basslines, drums that will kick you upside your head, plenty of fuzzy guitar tones and vocal melodies to tie these disparate things into approx. 3 minutes of pop punk goodness. Continue reading “Derry Girls Cherym Breathe New Life Into The DIY Pop-Punk Genre”

Band Spotlight: Molars [Interview]

Introducing Molars: new emo/pop-punk from Nottingham. FFO: Tiny Moving Parts, Neck Deep and Modern Baseball.

Molars are a new alternative / pop-punk / emo band from Nottingham with a fresh and exciting sound. We spoke to them to learn more.

You’re releasing your very first EP Tight, But Not Groundbreaking soon. How long has it been in the works?

Dec: We recorded the entire EP in June at Phoenix Sound Studios. Since then we’ve been doing a lot of work behind the scenes, such as filming our own music video.

Is the title what you’re aiming for, or are you predicting the reviews?

Matt: Funny story – after our first gig in Nottingham, a bloke from one of the other bands came over and said we sounded tight, but not groundbreaking. This seemed like a really weird thing to say to a band after they played their first ever set (however true it may be!), so it seemed only right to name our EP after this interaction!

How would you sum up Molars for someone who’s just discovering you?

Chris: I guess we come under the banner of pop punk for the most part but with some elements of emo with some of the guitar parts and lyrics.

Continue reading “Band Spotlight: Molars [Interview]”

EP Review: Bear Trap – Sugarcoated

Check out the new EP from Manchester pop-punkers, Bear Trap. FFO: The Starting Line, No Use For A Name, The Ataris.

Review by Mark Bartlett.

Manchester’s Bear Trap have got some pretty great stuff going on within the three tracks of their debut EP Sugarcoated (courtesy of Horn & Hoof Records), but the fresh 4-piece still have plenty of scope to grow into the best version of the noughties revivalist pop-punk unit they’re trying to be.

They’ve a really decent grasp of song structure and what makes for a good, uplifting chord progression, as well as a strong sense for a catchy lyrical hook. The opening bars of Goodbye really do an excellent job of cementing the Drive-Thru era sound and reeling in the listener. Bear Trap have claimed a Blink/Green Day/Yellowcard influence, but personally, I can mostly hear The Starting Line (which is no bad thing!). Lyrics like ‘I’ll wave you goodbye as the last train leaves, just say it’s not forever’ are pretty authentically classic emo. Bear Trap also score major points for sticking to their real accents and not falsely Americanising their sound; it really helps them carve out their own identity in a very crowded genre. Continue reading “EP Review: Bear Trap – Sugarcoated”

Gig Review: Might As Well Fest III (07/10/2017)

An exciting London charity all-dayer featuring Kamikaze Girls, Almedia, Eat Defeat, The Burnt Tapes, Sombulance and more.

Photo credit: Awesome pics courtesy of Roberto Gasparro @ LivePix.

Now in its third year, Might As Well Fest is socially-responsible all dayer split across two tiny London venues: The Macbeth in Hoxton and the infamous Old Blue Last in Shoreditch. If the cracking line-up isn’t enough to coax people down, the promoters are also using the forces of music for good, raising money for two worthy causes: CALM and SANDS.

When I hurriedly stumble into The Macbeth at 3.20pm, I’m concerned that I’m late but turns out that I needn’t have worried: they’ve had some troubles of their own. Don Blake and Sweet Little Machine have pulled out last minute, and You Know The Drill’s van has broken down outside Birmingham. As a result, they’ve had to shift timings, drum kits, amps and expectations. The change in the set times is actually a positive: the opening bands will now have a bigger crowd and the heel-draggers like me, who couldn’t make it earlier, won’t be missing out. Nonetheless, I’m reminded that we ought to be extremely thankful to anyone with the resilience to put on DIY shows!

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A handful of early-birds assemble to watch Thirteen, a Scottish group who’ve joined the bill at the last minute. They play old school punk with a rock ‘n’ roll flavour, which is good, but slightly out-of-sorts with the rest of the line-up, which is a combination of fast-punk and pop-punk. It’s good pub-punk and not a bad way to kick things off for the day.

As I reviewed their EP recently, I have been very excited to catch Our Lives In Cinema live. This is only their 8th gig and their freshness shows: they look a little awkward on stage at the beginning of the set, settling in after two songs.

They open with Cut and Run – an awesome throwback to a lot of energetic early noughties punk. You can hear a strong Jeff Rosenstock influence in Mark Bartlett’s frantic, emotional singing which is conveyed better live. Bartlett has a unique style of performance: he packs as many words into a bar as possible while shaking around the stage. Currently it looks a little awkward, but with more practice I expect it to become an integral part of their act. Otherwise, they’ve got a good, solid rhythm section, strong drumming and great backing vocals. They close on their most anthemic song, I Got This, leaving the audience happy. Once they’ve got a few more shows under their belt, I look forward to seeing a much more confident and comfortable band.

Lay It On The Line are up next at The Macbeth. They’re the most hardcore band of the day. It’s a brutal and disordered performance, with frontman Mike spending much of show writhing, crouched or lying on the stage while screaming bloody murder. He gives the impression of a man on the edge of breakdown extremely well. It’s all held together with some warmer guitar backing, adding a more melodic edge to their otherwise extreme sound.

It’s unusual to see bands with two standalone singers (Casual Nausea’s the only one I can think of), but it really works. Mike and Alice and equally adept at screaming and conveying a lot of anger and emotion. It’s hard to make out the lyrics but their explanations of the songs are both surprising and entertaining – one song’s dedicated to fans of the Marquis de Sade (of which they assume there are none in the room), another is about a head teacher who was killed by a rent boy after he failed to pay up…  It’s fascinating to know what inspires people’s song writing sometimes. They pull out a fantastic cover of Rotting Out’s Positive Views and end the set in a wail of feedback.

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Recap are up next, and they are fantastic. That’s the least you can expect from Dave House and Mark Pavey’s latest project – a reincarnation of Pacer and follow-up to The Steal. They jokingly say it’s only their second show, but they’re anything but new to the game. Continue reading “Gig Review: Might As Well Fest III (07/10/2017)”

EP Review: Our Lives in Cinema – S/T

The recent self-titled release from London’s Our Lives In Cinema is a tense blast of angsty pop-punk. FFO: Alkaline Trio, Polar Bear Club, Rival Schools.

South London post-hardcore/pop-punk crew Our Lives in Cinema have recently released a self-titled EP. Taking influence from early noughties emo, there are underlying flavours of Alkaline Trio and My Chemical Romance, infused with a more modern pop-punk twist. The EP is short and sweet with only three songs, but there’s a lot packed into it.

First track Cut and Run* is energetic and tense, with angsty multi-tracked vocal delivery. The tight guitar lines standout in the mix and overall it leaves me thinking of Rival Schools. The song descends into an interesting melodic multi-vocal section that reminds me a bit of Brand New’s execution on Deja Entendu.

You can definitely hear the influence of Jeff Rosenstock in the vocal on second track I’m Drunk! And None of This is Real. The song has the all-too-familiar feel of booze-fuelled memory loss, bad sleep and haunted dreams. Continue reading “EP Review: Our Lives in Cinema – S/T”