Punk Rock Weddings: Will & Felicia [Part 1 of 3]

Part 1 of our Wedding Special: Felicia tells us what it’s like to perform at your own wedding and how a DIY approach can make a difference.

Feature by Sarah Williams. Cover photo by Lisa Robjant.

Marriage is something that has never, ever appealed to me. In my view, weddings are an expensive social construct and the idea of religious nuptials is antiquated and reductive. You have to wear uncomfortable clothes, wait to pose for awkward photos and narrowly avoid drunkenly embarrassing yourself in front of someone’s new in-laws. The only upside is the occasional utterance of the magic words: open bar.

Or so I thought. In the last year I’ve heard of some brilliant wedding celebrations that have made me jealous, to say the least. Seeing some of my punk friends tie the knot is enough to make me re-evaluate the whole institution of marriage. Maybe it isn’t a complete farce after all?

I suppose organising a wedding is a lot like booking a gig: you’ve still got bands, beers and a heap of drunk mates to consider. Far from the notoriously shite cover bands and mobile discos that infest traditional weddings, we spoke to three very different couples who introduced their love of punk into their special days in an inspiring way.

Over these three articles, you’ll hear what it’s like to play a gig at your own reception, to have your first dance to Wonk Unit live, and to say “I do” just before watching Bad Religion headline.

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Photo by Smiles Photography.

First up are Will Spicer and Felicia Dahmen. Spicer’s known for having previously played in Luvdump, although he’s recently joined a new band, Cheap Heat. Felicia plays violin with Danny & The Moonlighters and the pair are on their way to forming their own hardcore band with some mates in Bury St Edmunds. Spicer’s a born and bred East Anglian, but Felicia’s all the way from Melbourne, Australia.

What made their wedding different was their DIY approach, and the fact that Felicia’s own band played at the reception. Spicer even had to leave his own wedding for half an hour to go and seek out an amplifier. I spoke to Felicia to find out a bit more. Continue reading “Punk Rock Weddings: Will & Felicia [Part 1 of 3]”

An Interview with Aerial Salad’s Jamie Munro [Part 2 of 2]

Aerial Salad’s frontman tells how the band started and how they got banned from Fest, in the second half of a two-part special feature.

Article by Sarah Williams. Photos by Bev/Hold My Pint.

Check out Part One here.

Aerial Salad have been playing together since high school, although they’ve only really been a proper band for two years. They’ve done a lot in that time: releasing their first album, getting added to the Plasterer Records roster and playing increasingly large shows, including Florida’s infamous annual punk rock event: Fest.

Roach, released last week, is a raw, angsty record, that takes cues from bands like Jawbreaker, Greenday and Gnarwolves. Misery, mundanity and self-loathing are the most prescient themes on the album, although musically it’s very upbeat. Chatting to singer/guitarist, Jamie Munro, it’s clear that his life if underlined by a negative outlook that many of us can relate to, with his passion for music driving him forward through is shitty day job and crippling self-doubt.

Jamie and I covered a lot of ground in Part One, but early in the conversation he told me a story that deserved an article in its own right.  We got chatting about the perils of drinking wine that you’ve found open in a roadside in London. We determined pretty quickly that although Jamie’s got some punk sensibilities, he draws the line at street wine (quite rightly so).

I asked him what the most punk thing he’s ever done is, and he suddenly comes out with this corker:

“The most punk thing we’ve ever done was to play Fest, and then get banned from ever playing again.”

It turns out that this unexpected gem is also the origin story of Aerial Salad.

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You got banned from Fest? Tell me about that!

Fest is the main reason Aerial Salad all happened. This was only two years ago; but I was a miserable piece of shit, I was well depressed.

When you’re properly depressed it makes you into a cunt: once you have no regard for your own well-being, it makes it really difficult to have regard for other people’s well-being. If your own emotions are so bleak, you don’t care about upsetting other people, so you can become a narcissistic arsehole. Not everyone does! Positive people who deal with depression are incredible, because it’s a very selfish illness, and it can turn you into a piece of shit. It took me a really long time to realise that’s what I was doing. Continue reading “An Interview with Aerial Salad’s Jamie Munro [Part 2 of 2]”

An Interview with Aerial Salad’s Jamie Munro [Part 1 of 2]

Aerial Salad’s frontman talks to us about self-hatred, songwriting and touring successes and setbacks, in the first half of a two-part special feature.

Article by Sarah Williams. Photos by Bev/Hold My Pint.

I manage to catch up with Aerial Salad’s Jamie Munro on a wet Tuesday evening in October, on the eve of the release of their first album, Roach. Jamie has spent the last hour or so stuck on one of Manchester’s buses, and curses the heavens for deciding to open just as he’s lit a cigarette. I wouldn’t call Jamie a tortured genius, but he’s got an uncanny knack for channelling life’s little day-to-day tragedies into something creative.

He has plenty to be excited about, though; 2017 has been a big year for Aerial Salad. The young trio from Manchester have been playing increasingly bigger shows with the likes of The Bouncing Souls and PEARS, plus big festivals like Rebellion. Roach has just been launched on Alex Brindle-Johnson’s label Plasterer Records, and they’re embarking on a full-on three week tour with Wonk Unit this week. Jamie sings and plays guitar, with Mike Wimbleton on bass and Jack Appleby on drums completing the trio.

I could chat to Jamie for hours; he’s funny, self-deprecating and bubbling with youthful exuberance. Mid-interview, he asks me, “Can you say I was ‘the voice of a generation yet to be heard’? Because then it can say that on my gravestone. It’s very arrogant.” We had so much to discuss that I’ve split this interview into two shorter parts.

Read on to learn about Aerial Salad’s touring successes and failures, plus Jamie’s take on songwriting and musical influences. In tomorrow’s instalment, we find out the origin story of Aerial Salad, how they got banned from playing Fest and why Jamie hates himself with a burning passion.

For a fairly new band, you’ve managed to get onto some big gigs like Fest and Rebellion. How have you managed that?

This band is based on two things: naiveté and luck. That’s what’s beautiful about the DIY scene: you’re only ever four gigs away from playing with one of your favourite bands. The only difference with us is that we’ve had loads of time to gig, because we allowed ourselves to get shit jobs so we can afford to play in a band all the time.

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What are the biggest gigs you’ve played recently?

The biggest one we’ve done was Rebellion, but I think Wonk Fest was the best show we’ve played. The first gig we did with Beach Slang at Brudenell Social Club was fucking ridiculous. That was the first good set we ever played. That was just after Alex [Brindle Johnson, of Wonk Unit] had started managing us. He had seen how shit we were, and he told us we needed to be better. He taught us how to be good.

Didn’t you have a support slot with The Bouncing Souls that went a bit awry?

Yeah, there was a miscommunication between the promoter and the tour manager. We turned up after a five and a half hour drive to Norwich all excited for our first proper tour, ready to get stuck in and play with The Bouncing Souls. Their tour manager was like, “Who are you? There’s only three bands playing tonight and you’re not one of them.”

God bless him, Dan, who was putting on the gig, was like, “Please can you just let these children play this show?” We went on 10 minutes before doors opened and played a 20 minute set. Our friend walked in halfway through Dunhills and just thought we were sound-checking. Before you knew it, Great Cynics were on.

So, we did play with The Bouncing Souls and no one can take that away from us, even though we did play before doors opened and no one saw us. It’s alright.

Continue reading “An Interview with Aerial Salad’s Jamie Munro [Part 1 of 2]”

Spoilers: Interview with Dan Goatham

Jake chats to Dan about the new Spoilers album, new 7 Day Conspiracy material and old days in the Kent punk-scene.

Interview by Jake Jeremy. Photos by Mark Richards.

Dan Goatham is the lead singer and rhythm guitarist of Kent’s finest melodic punk band: Spoilers.

I’ve known Dan ever since my early ska-punk playing days around the dirge of the Medway towns. Back then then he fronted 7 Day Conspiracy, a band who produced politically-charged punk anthems that made them one of the South East’s most sought after acts.

Spoilers are Dan’s latest project of many. They’re a 4-piece melodic punk act with a knack for writing tunes that are catchier than chlamydia and a whole lot less irritating. Back in 2015 they released their first EP Stay Afloat and they’ve since become a regular name on the UK live circuit.

I spoke to Dan just after his set at The Smokehouse in Ipswich, on a bill that also included Causal Nausea and Grand Collapse (check out our review here). Here’s what we got up to…

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Shout Louder: I’m joined by Dan Goatham from… Spoilers, Southport, 7 Day Conspiracy, Melchett… Are there any bands I’m missing?

Dan: I played in a band called Morgan’s Puff Adder when I was growing up. They were a ska-punk band in Kent. That was like 15, 16, maybe 17 years ago.

Shout Louder: Wow, that’s a name I haven’t heard in a long time! [Check out their Myspace page here] I was in a ska punk band in Kent so I definitely remember MPA.

Dan: The Throwoffs?

Shout Louder: OK, less about me! [Both laugh awkwardly and knowingly.] Let’s talk Spoilers and specifically your influences. I’ve noticed that your vocal delivery is very Leatherface.

Dan: Yeah, very Leatherface, although some of the early stuff that Frankie [Stubbs] did was quite high, a lot of the stuff he did is quite low and he doesn’t push it too hard. But, yeah, they’re a massive influence throughout Spoilers in general. Everyone is a big fan of Leatherface. Continue reading “Spoilers: Interview with Dan Goatham”

Interview with Matilda’s Scoundrels: “A shit Mumford and Sons, but a good Gogol Bordello.”

We spoke to Dan and Jens about writing their new album, organising Wotsit Called Fest and getting thrown off a pier.

Interview by Sarah Williams. Photos and video by Mark Richards.

Matilda’s Scoundrels must be one of the hardest-working bands in the UK DIY scene.

They’ve been touring up and down the country, popping up on all-dayers, in pubs and at a whole range of festivals this summer, building up a reputation as a cannot-miss live act. Although they’ve been together for three and a half years, it wasn’t until September 2017 that they released their first full-length album As The Tide Turns (review here). It’s 42 minutes of rollicking, overdriven aggro-folk, with all the calms and crests of a rough sea and plenty of rousing shout-alongs.

I sat with down guitarist Dan Flanagan and accordionist Jens-Peter Jensen at The Palace in Hastings, just before doors open for the main day of Wotsit Called Fest. The festival is a two-day blend of different genres, with DIY at its heart. It’s organised by Dan and Jens, plus Kathy Butler and The Barracks’ Mark Tanner.  Matilda’s Scoundrels also treated the Friday night as their album release party, playing a storming set to a room full of enthralled fans.

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Given that we were all still up celebrating at 4am, we had a surprisingly sprightly chat, however when I asked them about As The Tide Turns Dan and Jens both paused to give consideration to each answer, rather than diving straight in with a response. I started to get an insight into the care and consideration that’s gone into writing and producing this brilliant new record…

How did Matilda’s Scoundrels first get started?

  • Jens: We all did exactly the same thing that most people did; we met up at gigs, we drank and had fun together. One day we decided it would be a great idea to start a band. It tumbled from there.

You’ve been together a long time, so it feels like there’s been a lot leading up to the first album. How long have you been working on it?

  • Dan: It’s taken us forever!
  • Jens: We’d released a couple of EPs and some singles. We’ve released music every year.
  • Dan: Getting on for 2 years ago, we wrote the first songs.
  • Jens: It didn’t take long to record…
  • Dan: It did take long to record.
  • Jens: Okay, yeah, that’s a lie.
  • Dan: About 8 months. We wanted to take our time with it; an album is quite a big thing so we wanted to make sure we did it right. There’s a lot of us, that’s the thing.
  • Jens: There are six of us. It’s going to be a lot easier to do it if you’re a two piece punk band, because you have three major instruments and that’s it. To be honest, it wasn’t that hard to write, because we are a very writing-focussed band. There are always songs that we’re playing, trying to push up and trying to write.
  • Dan: We’ve already a got a couple towards the next album.
  • Jens: There are several tracks towards the next album! Whether they make it or not is another story!

Continue reading “Interview with Matilda’s Scoundrels: “A shit Mumford and Sons, but a good Gogol Bordello.””

The Crash Mats: Pies, Panpipes and the Dizzy Heights of Rockstardom [Interview]

“We’re like a Tunnock’s tea-cake. We’re dead soft and squidgy on the top and round the middle, but we’re hardcore underneath.”

The Crash Mats are hands-down one of the most entertaining live acts I have ever seen. They’re a damn good band that blend elements of punk, ska and hardcore, but their real talent lies in 24-carat comedy.

They’ve recently put out their second album 69 Peruvian Panpipe Classics on Manchester DIY label Horn & Hoof. It’s a rollicking ride through 21 classic tunes, including: Don’t Tell Mum That The Babysitter’s Dead, I Don’t Want To Go To Grandma’s House Tonight and My Girlfriend Only Has 24 Hours To Live. It’s a genuine feel-good album, reflecting the gargantuan level of fun you are guaranteed at their live shows.

Interrogating three such distinguished gentlemen as these is a rare opportunity, so I jumped at the chance to interview Oldham’s finest shortly after their set at Wotsit Called Fest.

It turns out that Danny Barrett a.k.a. Evil Bazz (vocals + bass), Dan Royales a.k.a. Seniòr Royales (guitar) and Chris ‘da beat’ Webb (drums) are even more hilarious in person than they are on stage. Huddled in a corner of the dingy backroom of The Palace in Hastings, surrounded by punks loading in instruments and beer floating in buckets of half-melted ice, we had a deeply poignant and meaningful discussion.

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You’ve just come off stage at Wotsit Called Fest. You’re rock stars. How do you feel?

  • Royales: Well, I always said to my Mum – “Just you watch.” After seeing Queen I said, “Mum, I’m gonna be a rock star.” It don’t surprise me at all.
  • Bazz: We’ve reached the dizzy heights of Freddy Mercury here, playing Wotsit Called Festival. Next we’re getting a plane to LA and playing twice in one day.
  • Shout Louder: You mean you don’t have a helicopter?
  • Royales: Not yet. The Crash Copter is out of action at the moment, it’s coming next week.

You’ve recently released a new album: 69 Peruvian Panpipe Classics. What inspired your song writing?

  • Bazz: Cannabis, professional wrestling and my Grandma.
  • Royales: We watched a documentary about 14th century French art and that’s where we got our inspiration.
  • Bazz: It is pretty deep, if you scratch beneath the surface. Below the thin veneer of intelligence.

Have you considered learning the pan pipes?

  • Chris: We were going to do it for the album, but we’re just too modest. If Bazz started playing the pan pipes at a gig he’d just steal the show. He’s prevented himself from playing the pan pipes for the good of The Crash Mats, I think.

Continue reading “The Crash Mats: Pies, Panpipes and the Dizzy Heights of Rockstardom [Interview]”

Nosebleed: Boomtown, MPF and Getting High on Frisbee [Interview]

“We change our suits every time we do a record. The embarrassment of our smell is the incentive to write more material.”

For three years, Nosebleed have been gallivanting around the country, bewildering audiences with their energetic live performances. They play lo-fi punk ‘n’ roll with panache, with a reputation for being band-of-the-night even when they’re not top of the bill.

Their live shows defy comparison: it’s something you need to experience for yourself. Ben and Eliott are seemingly incapable of remaining on-stage and usually cause a ruckus by hauling their mic-stands and guitars into the crowd, continuing the show in the middle of the dancefloor. It goes far beyond the average pit-and-pyramid format seen at most punk gigs (although you get that too). Stylishly decked out in blue velour suits, western ties and polished brogues, visually they have more in common with a ‘50s variety show than the hardcore punk bills they tend to play.

Since 2014 they’ve also released two EPs and a Greatest Hits album Hit After Hit After Hit (which contains every song from the EPs). To say that every song they’ve recorded is a greatest hit isn’t an overstatement: they’re all infectious garage-punk bangers that’ll stick in your head for weeks on end.

I was lucky enough to have a natter with the northern trio ahead of their recent gig at The Smokehouse in Ipswich: Eliott Verity (guitar + vocals), Ben Hannah (bass + vocals) and Dicky Riddims (drums + massive grins).

They’re just as entertaining to talk to as they are on stage. Enjoy.

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Ben and Eliott out in the crowd at The Smokehouse.

Welcome to Ipswich! We’re seriously excited for your set. Have you always done the jumping-out-in-the-crowd thing?

  • Eliott: Yeah, from the very beginning we’ve done that.
  • Ben: I think it started in London. It was the bar!
  • Eliott: I was really thirsty [during our set in London] so I went to the bar, and I just carried on playing. And then it became a thing. I mean it kinda came from my brother, who was in a band called The Franceens. They did it a lot, and I thought, yeah, that’s cool. I’m doing that.
  • Ben: You stole it.
  • Eliott: We stole it. It made them go away, and now it’s just us.

Dicky, when Ben and Eliott are out cavorting in the crowd, you’re left all on your own on stage. Do you ever feel a bit left out?

  • Dicky: Well, I always say that I come out to play music with my mates and I always end up sat on my own. No one recognises me.
  • Eliott: No one knows who Dicky is. People walk past him to come to me, to say, “Is there someone here selling your merch?” Some guys asked Dicky, “Do you know anyone in Nosebleed who could sell me a t-shirt?”
  • Ben: We were in Oldham last week. This guy comes up to me to say ‘good set’. He shook my hand and then just looked at Dicky and nodded. Dicky [looked a bit deflated] and the guy was like, “What was up with him?”
  • Dicky: It’s awful. [Cracks up laughing]

2sickmonkeys-nosebleeds-bobbyfunk-12Do you ever wish you could sit down and do a nice acoustic set?

  • Eliott: Not even an acoustic set; I wish I could quit music.
  • [Laughter]
  • Ben: It was originally talked about for Boomtown. Alec and Laura Freestone [who run Last Gang In Town / Devil Kicks Dancehall] asked if we would be interested in playing acoustic, as they only normally put acoustic on The Last Stand… I can’t imagine how that would sound. I’m actually terrible at bass, I just hide it with distortion! Eliott solos all the time but it’d be a bit plinky-plonky on an acoustic guitar.
  • Eliott: We could do one of the swing sets we’ve done: swing covers and stuff like that.
  • Ben: We’ve recorded some lounge music.
  • Eliott: But that’s just for us. It was going to be a ghost track on a CD but it never happened.

Continue reading “Nosebleed: Boomtown, MPF and Getting High on Frisbee [Interview]”